TRC Read to Kids

Welcome to The Reading Connection’s blog, where you’ll find the best guidance on reading aloud to kids. Whether you are a TRC Read-Aloud volunteer, parent or student, the book themes and crafts ideas, child development guidelines and recommended websites will expand your world. For 25 years, The Reading Connection has worked to improve the lives of at-risk kids by linking the magic of reading to fun experiences that inspire a passion for learning. Visit our website at www.thereadingconnection.org.

Monday, March 13, 2017

Voices of homeless youth

The Reading Connection works with at-risk children in different settings, including homeless shelters. Most of the information we find, and eventually provide to you, comes in the form of research studies or news reports. We rarely hear from the kids themselves.


In the video featured below, you'll hear candid, and sometimes heartbreaking, descriptions of the stark realities kids face, as well as insights into the far-reaching effects of homelessness and caring adults in a young person's life. This video has been provided by The SchoolHouse Connection, a new national organization promoting success for children and youth experiencing homelessness.  

This video spotlights the voices of homeless youth. From SchoolHouse Connection's Education and Homelessness: Young Children to Young Adults series, "this video features four young people talking about their homeless experiences and sharing advice for educators and service providers."


Although the young people featured in this video are older than those TRC typically serves, many of them were homeless as younger children. They provide important insights to what it is like to be a homeless kid and shine a light on the fact that experiencing homelessness in a family can contribute to a teen becoming homeless on their own -- an "unattended youth." 

A recent study of homeless and formerly homeless youth found that 47 percent experienced homelessness both with their family, and on their own. http://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/unaccompanied-youth/





In the video, the teens talk about what education means to them: stability, opportunity, escape. Not only did school provide structure, safety, heat, food, and support, learning itself was empowering. By supporting reading development, TRC's Read-Alouds help kids be more successful at school and make learning more enjoyable.

The teens also offer some advice.
  • Don't single kids out -- use discretion
  • Encourage -- the challenges of homelessness can damage a kid's confidence
  • Respect -- sometimes when a victim receives service, it feels like they are being treated like the criminal instead
  • Provide support, but respect boundaries -- don't become a parent figure for a child if you aren't able to fulfill that role
  • Follow through -- that's essential to building trust
  • Be empowering -- teach kids how to advocate for themselves
  • Don't judge a book by its cover. Never assume. Just be yourself and have a conversation
  • Listen -- and seek to understand, not judge. Then advocate for the child throughout their journey through homelessness

Watch the video to hear these young people share their experiences. Their message is important and powerful, and it tells you so much more than a research report ever could.


To receive credit for this online training, please fill out the form here.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Picture Books as Powerful Portals

Sharing and exploring diversity with children’s literature

Children’s literature serves as both a mirror and a window. To develop a sense of identity and self-esteem, children need to find mirrors in which they see themselves and their experiences reflected in the books they read for both pleasure and school. Equally important, however, is the ability of books to open windows into new worlds and experiences. Picture books are powerful portals that transport children to special places, both internal and external, where they can explore familiar terrain, experience new adventures, and discover unknown treasures.



One of the goals of TRC’s Read-Aloud Program is to help kids “discover the magic of books and reading.” By integrating diverse picture books into our programming, we can help our children discover this magic but also expand their horizons and open their imaginations. Volunteers can build the children’s self-esteem and cultivate empathy, respect, and cultural and global awareness through their book choices.  

Choosing diverse literature focusing on a variety of perspectives allows volunteers to explore different cultures by incorporating multicultural resources in Read-Alouds, as well as recognize that children are shaped by personal experiences and culture. Sharing these books shows an appreciation for the diversity of the cultures found at TRC sites and celebrates that diversity as well as our shared experiences.

Finding diverse books isn’t difficult, but beware -- not all diverse books are created equally. There is a large diversity gap in children’s publishing. In 2015, only 26 percent of children’s books published depicted children of color, and the number of books published annually by authors of color is even lower. Older books can unfortunately propagate outdated and inappropriate cultural stereotypes. 

Here are some useful resources to get started:



We Need Diverse Books:  Check out the "Where to Find Diverse Books" page for an extensive list of resources and suggested websites. 
CBC Diversity:  The resources section of this Children’s Book Council site has recommendations for parents and caregivers and for teachers and librarians that would be helpful at Read-Alouds.
Youth Media Awards:  Announced annually by the American Library Association, these awards include the Coretta Scott King Award, the Pura Belpré Award, and the Schneider Family Book Award. The 2017 awards were announced on January 23rd.

These resources will help you find great books suited to the kids at your Read-Aloud sites. To get you started, here are some child-tested and -approved recommendations.

Radiant Child:  The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat
by Javaka Steptoe  
This year's Caldecott winner explores the childhood of American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. The vibrant collage and painted illustrations are perfect for playing “I Spy” with the kids using repeated symbols.







The Princess and the Warrior:  The Tale of Two Volcanoes 
by Duncan Tonatiuh
This retelling of the classic Mexican legend of the creation of the Iztaccihuatl and Popocatepetl volcanoes, located near Mexico City, won the Pura Belpré Award this year. Tonatiuh uses Mixtec influences to recreate the love story between the beautiful Izta and the warrior Popoca.







Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music 
written by Margarita Engle and illustrated by Rafael Lopez
This book is based on the true story of a young Chinese-African-Cuban girl, Millo Castro Zaldarriaga, who grew up with the sounds of drums pounding in her heart and aspirations of playing the drums dancing through her dreams. Drum Dream Girl won the Pura Belpré illustration medal for 2015, along with the 2016 Charlotte Zolotov Award (CCBC), and the Asian Pacific American Honors.





Ada Twist, Scientist
written by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts
Ada is a young girl with lots of questions. Wanting to know what the world is about keeps landing her in trouble. Will Ada find the answers she is looking for? This is a book for curious scientists everywhere. 









Giant Steps to Change the World 
written by Spike Lee and illustrated by Sean Qualls 
Every person has the power to change the world, and many people have taken that brave first step. What does it take?  Bravery, strength, and intellect. Read Giant Steps to learn about how many heroes took their courageous first step to make the world a better place. 





I Lost My Tooth in Africa 
by Penda Diakité
Amina is on her way to visit her father's family in Africa when she discovers a loose tooth. She wants to lose her tooth in Africa because the African Tooth Fairy will bring her a chicken. As she visits family and friends and experiences daily life in an African village, she wiggles her tooth. 


The books volunteers bring to a Read-Aloud can do so much more than represent a theme like music or loose teeth when they are chosen carefully to reflect the experiences of the kids. Including diverse books at Read-Alouds will help TRC kids become regular and passionate readers by affirming their experiences and providing a path to exploring others'.




This post was written by Julie M. Esanu, MLIS, lower school librarian at St. Stephen's and St. Agnes School and TRC board member.

To receive credit for this online training, please fill out the form here.

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Fun (not frantic) Read-Alouds


When kids walk in to a Read-Aloud, they may be in a rambunctious mood from playtime, stressed or hungry after a long day, or antsy after sitting in a classroom for hours.  Getting everyone calmed down and on task can sometimes seem impossible.  In fact, in our recent volunteer survey, calming and engaging high-energy kids was the most requested training topic.  Our December 2016 training covered skills and strategies for welcoming, calming, and engaging kids at Read-Alouds--here are some highlights.    

Talk to your fellow volunteers about the skills and strategies in this post. If your entire team is aware of these techniques, implementation will be much easier.

What are your expectations?
Before we start talking about strategies, the expectations you start out with should be appropriate, realistic, and consistent. Expectations should be


  • Age-appropriate.  The physical, social, and intellectual needs of the kids you work with will vary. A 4-year-old and an 8-year-old won't behave the same way or be interested in the same things.
  • Culturally aware. Remember that you are in their home or in their space, not at a school, library, or your home. Different social, cultural, and ethnic groups have varying social norms about the volume and give-and-take of conversation, especially with family and friends. Just because kids might be louder than you would be doesn’t necessarily mean they are wrong. 
  • Trauma-informed. Some TRC kids are experiencing stress that is, in some cases, persistent and toxic. Toxic stress damages brain development, including the connections between parts of the brain. That affects a kid’s executive function. Executive function is the ability to follow directions, manage one’s emotions and reactions to situations, and defer gratification.

To best ways to accommodate our kids’ needs include the following: 
  • Have appropriate expectations.
  • Be consistent. When the kids know what to expect, it is easier for them to positively engage. You can increase consistency by having a standard welcoming process used by all the teams at your site and by consistently enforcing rules and boundaries.
  • Prepare a structured Read-Aloud.
  • Give simple, short instructions.

Beginning the Read-Aloud 

One tried-and-true way to draw kids into your Read-Aloud is to engage their curiosity. Try one of the following tactics at your Read-Aloud:

A book box for Zin, Zin, Zin A Violin
contains sheet music, rosin, a
violin string and other related items
  • Using a book box, show items related to the theme and encourage kids talk about what they know about the items.  Then they can guess the theme.
  • Display the books for the Read-Aloud. Encourage kids to look at the books as they come in. A volunteer or two can talk with the kids about the books and ask them to guess the theme.
  • Start reading right away in small groups as kids come in and get their name tags. Once everyone has arrived, gather the group, review the Promises, and introduce the theme.
  • Provide word searches or mazes for the kids to work on right away, or tell riddles or jokes related to your theme and ask the kids to guess the theme. A quick internet search will provide lots of options for word searches, mazes, and riddles. For example: type “pirates kid word search” in your Google search box. You’ll come up with results like this.
Not only will you get the kids excited about the theme, but you’ll increase their comprehension by helping them remember what they already know about the topic.


Atten--tion!!

When you need to get the group's attention, use a consistent “attention-getter,” such as these call-and-response phrases, or use the attention-getter currently used by the site staff.  Here are some favorites.  

Call: Bump budda bump bump              Response: bump bump

Call: 1,2,3, eyes on me                        Response: 1, 2 eyes on you

Call: If you can hear my voice, clap once        Response: clap 
Call: If you can hear my voice, clap twice       Response: clap clap


Calming activities

To calm kids before or during your Read-Aloud, try the following physical activities:

  • Yoga can relax kids and increase focus and concentration. At the training, Charlie demonstrated several poses, including tree, eagle with arms and legs, mountain with prayer hands, rag doll, warrior poses 1, 2, and 3, and child’s pose.
  • Focused breathing can calm kids and improve their attention. Stephanie taught several breathing techniques that the kids can do individually, in pairs, or as a group.



Energy-burning activities

After sitting all day at school, sometimes kids need to burn off some excess energy. Try these ideas before and during your Read-Aloud.
  • Energizers are short songs or rhymes with movement. They are perfect for vigorous but limited activity. "Go Bananas" is one of our favorites.  
  • Games, like "Simon Says," "Red Light Green Light," or "Mother May I?" can provide a needed outlet for energy in a structured way.
  • Incorporating kid movement WHILE you read aloud can be as simple as 
  • Asking the kids a question and having them turn and talk to each other, instead of selecting one child to answer for the whole group.
  • Identifying a part of the book you will be reading that lends itself to the kids acting out and encouraging them to do so when you get to that part. Look for repetition or active language when you pre-read the book. 
  • Involving the senses. Let kids snack while listening or give them items related to the story to hold during reading.



When all else fails...

Sometimes you will still have to redirect disruptive behavior. When you do, follow these guidelines.

Connect, then correct
  • Develop your relationship with the kids from the get-go. Engage BEFORE there is a problem. Don’t let the first time a kid is talked to at the Read-Aloud be to be corrected.
  • Call the kids by name, look them in the eye, sit at their level, and LISTEN to what they have to say.

Put the child to work

  • Turning the page,
  • Pointing out something in the illustrations,
  • Helping set up the activity,
  • Helping pass out snacks or set up the book give-away.

Abide by the promises yourselves


Model positive behavior -- your words and behavior can model positive behavior and conversation


Leverage site staff involvement
  • Use your site's attention-getting strategies
  • Use your site's behavior guidelines or incentives 
  • Ask staff for help

Getting to know the kids at your Read-Aloud, welcoming them each week, piquing their curiosity, and including movement to calm your kids or burn energy, along with consistent and appropriate expectations and rules, can make your Read-Alouds fun, not frantic.  Talk with the other volunteers at your site and identify some strategies you'd like to use, and then give them a try.

To receive credit for this online training, please fill out the form here.

Monday, December 12, 2016

At your fingertips: Abundant Read-Aloud themes


As a Reading Connection volunteer, you know how important it is to come to your Read-Aloud prepared. Having a great theme, a variety of good books, an engaging activity, talking points, and sometimes a tasty snack, can make all the difference between a rollicking good time and a stressful evening.

All that planning takes time, though, especially if you are starting from scratch. But there's no need to make it hard on yourself. TRC has dozens of Read-Alouds, planned out, in detail, waiting for you.

Volunteer Central
TRC’s volunteer database, Volunteer Central, contains a bank of themes collected from your Read-Alouds and Reading Road Maps compiled over the past several years. 



To search for a theme for your next Read-Aloud,

  • Log in to Volunteer Central.
  • Click the "Find Ideas for an Upcoming Read-Aloud" button on the upper right, or select “Read-Aloud Themes List” from the Read-Alouds menu at the top of your screen. The right-hand column of the table indicates if the themes have a Reading Road Map. To only show themes that have a Reading Road Map, click the "Reading Road Map Included?" column header.
  • Click on a theme. You'll find a list of the books read and activities done at any Read-Aloud that used this theme. A purple Reading Road Map link next to the theme name will take you to a printable PDF of the Reading Road Map.

You can also search recent Read-Alouds that have been held at your site or at other sites by


  • Selecting "Recent Read-Alouds" in the Read-Aloud menu. The system will default to show only your site, but you can select all sites to see themes from other sites. 
  • Selecting the date will bring you to the report summary of that Read-Aloud.
  • Selecting the theme will take you to a compilation of books and activities used with that theme.



Reading Road Maps
In addition to being stored on Volunteer Central, Reading Road Maps come right to your email every other month.  TRC sends Reading Road Maps to all of our volunteers. 


If you don't always keep the Reading Road Map emails, another way to find Reading Road Maps in Volunteer Central is to sort the themes so that the ones with Reading Road Maps show up first.  If you haven't been receiving the Reading Road Maps, check your spam folder or your Promotions tab, if you use Gmail. 


TRC's Blog
TRC's blog -- yes, the one you are reading right now -- also has lots of Read-Aloud themes and outlines. You can sign up to get it delivered to your email. Just put your email in the field labeled, in purple, "Follow by E-mail" on the right side of the page.

For posts specifically about planning, search for Read-Aloud reports or Read-Aloud themes.  Two Summer Reading posts (this one and this one) also have links to outlines. You can click on the theme (picnics, for example) and it will take you to an outline.

If you have a theme, but need activities, movement ideas, crafts, or ideas about how to best engage preschoolers or older kids, you can search the blog for helpful posts.


Outside Resources



Finally, other organizations and blogs produce themed readings outlines. Start With a Book is one of our favorites, and it happens to be based out of WETA, the PBS station in Arlington. Also available through WETA's Reading Rockets website are Reading Adventure Packs, which also have a list of fiction and nonfiction books related to a theme, and activities.





WorldCat is an international library database that lets you search for books, read reviews, preview contents, and see themed recommended book lists that others (including TRC) have created. If you are looking for books to beef up your Read-Aloud choices, you can even find links to similar books and related subjects. And the best thing about WorldCat is that you can see which library near you has the books you want.

Don't stress
The next time you have a Read-Aloud to plan, remember, we've already done the work for you. Check out Volunteer Central, your email, or Reading Rockets' Start with A Book or Reading Adventure Packs for fully planned Read-Alouds. Gather the books and materials listed on the outline, Reading Road Map, or Read-Aloud report and get ready for a rollicking good time!

To receive credit for this online training, please fill out the form here.

Monday, November 14, 2016

Read-Aloud Report: 1, 2, 3, Read with me!


Thanks to Kristin Stadum, a long-time Read-Aloud volunteer at Freedom Place, for this Read-Aloud report.  TRC spotlights Read-Alouds that successfully build reading skills and motivation while also being fun for kids and volunteers. These Read-Aloud reports act as a resource for other volunteers and provide examples for the public of our program.

I can't remember what I had originally intended for the theme for the night, but it certainly wasn't numbers. I thought numbers would be too dry, too staid, too nerdy by far! But when I was at the library, great titles kept jumping off the shelves.



"Well, here goes nothing," I thought and settled on numbers as the theme.

As the kids picked up their name tags, we had them guess the number of blueberries in one jar and cherries in another. Later, these would form part of the night's snack.
An example of a book box for
Zin, Zin, Zin A Violin
contains sheet music, rosin, a violin
string and other related items.

We introduced the topic with a book box (an idea from the a TRC volunteer seminar on the brain). Before presenting the books, we pulled items related to numbers out of a box and passed them around the room, giving the kids a chance to guess the nature of our theme. An abacus was quickly followed by a ruler, calculator, phone, playing card, dominoes, dice, and foreign coins.

Each kid held onto a multicolored, multi-sided dice (each one unique) and/or a foreign coin as the evening progressed. While the items didn't exactly keep them from fidgeting, they helped keep the focus on numbers while we read books like 100 Things That Make Me Happy, 17 Things I Am Not Allowed to Do Anymore, and The Three Little Pigs.

Here's a list of the books we used:
We brought a lot of books to be sure there was something that appealed to everyone. A few books were read to the whole group, while others were read to multiple small groups. Some didn't get read at all.

After reading, we revealed how many berries and cherries each jar contained and divvied them up as part of our snack. Then we played a clapping game* focused on numbers (which failed miserably but centered the kids) and donned pedometers to see who could get the most steps by the time that a song (8 Days a Week by the Beatles) ended. Participants were urged to dance, jump, or run in place –- anything to increase their step count. The winners received foreign coins and individual die as medals. (*See below for clapping game examples.)

Going into the Read-Aloud, we were unsure how many kids would be attending and whether we would be able to spend time outdoors. We played the activity by ear but planned alternate activities such as playing hopscotch, Go Fish, and dominoes. (**See below for an alternative activity.)

What makes this Read-Aloud so effective? 
  • It has a theme that unifies the experience but is broad enough to accommodate different ages and interests.
  • A wide variety of great Read-Aloud books are available on the topic.
  • It incorporates sensory experiences (holding items, eating blueberries and cherries, listening to music) and movement (clapping and dancing or running).
  • The activities related well to the theme and allowed the kids to experience the theme in concrete ways.
  • It had alternate activities planned to accommodate the kids or the environment.
If you have conducted a super successful Read-Aloud, please contact Stephanie at sberman@thereadingconneciton.org. 


*Concentration Clapping Game

While sitting on the floor, assign everyone a number and start a rhythm by slapping thighs twice and clapping twice. A person says her own number with the thigh slaps and someone else's number with the claps. The second person picks it up and says a third. If a kid misses his/her number or the beat, then he/she is out (but still clapping). It keeps going until only one person is left.

Concentration (slap slap clap clap)
Are you ready? (slap slap clap clap)
If– so –(slap slap clap clap)
Let’s– go!(slap slap clap clap)

Then, player one, continuing the rhythm, says her own number twice followed by another number in the circle.

For example:
Player one: 1, 1, 4, 4 (slap slap clap clap)
Player four: 4, 4, 7, 7 (slap slap clap clap)
Player seven: 7, 7, 3, 3 (slap slap clap clap)

Anybody who makes a mistake or fails to keep the rhythm is out but remains in the circle, making it more difficult for the other players, who must remember not to use the numbers of the people who are out.


**One Frog


The first person says, "One Frog."
The next person says, "In the water."
And the next person says, "Kerplunk."

Now, increase everything by one.

So, the next person in the circle says, "Two Frogs."
And the next person says, "Two Frogs."
The person after that says, "In the water."
"In the water."
"Kerplunk."
"Kerplunk."

Again, anybody who makes a mistake or fails to keep the rhythm is out.

To receive credit for this online training, please fill out the form here.

Monday, October 17, 2016

Fiction and Nonfiction: Better Together

In my school library, I recently overheard a couple of students brainstorming ideas for their science project. They both had visited relatives over the summer who lived in Michigan and were discussing algae growth on Lake Erie and whether they could do their project on algae blooms. 





When I heard “Lake Erie,” my mind turned to The Lorax

“You’re glumping the pond where the Humming Fish hummed! 
No more can they hum for their gills are all gummed. 
So, I’m sending them off. Oh their future is dreary. 
They’ll walk on their fins and get woefully weary. 
In search of some water that isn’t so smeary. 
I hear things are just as bad in Lake Erie.”

Dr. Seuss removed the line about Lake Erie from The Lorax in 1985 at the behest of staff at Ohio Sea Grant.  They felt that, thanks to anti-pollution efforts, Lake Erie was much improved. 

I asked the students if they knew that this wasn’t the first time Lake Erie had been in trouble and that Dr. Seuss had even pointed out its problems with pollution when the The Lorax was published in 1971.

They were very interested to know that one of their favorite authors shared a real-world interest with them, and they had many more questions about what Dr. Seuss’s life was like apart from writing the books they know and love.

These budding scientists were focused on facts about algae but found a fascinating connection to the ongoing struggle to keep Lake Erie healthy through fiction. They left the library with books on plants and algae as well as a biography of Dr. Seuss and The Lorax.

Some students love to focus on nonfiction. Others love a made-up story. But when you can help them combine and connect to both nonfiction and fiction, you engage and expose them to different types of text while also boosting comprehension and building their background knowledge, vocabulary and critical thinking skills.  

Typically, kids’ natural curiosity gets them asking questions about things they discover from books. Often it is a fictional title that will get them wondering. Could it ever really be cloudy with a chance of meatballs? Can you make friends with a robot? Do fish really work together?





You can anticipate questions and help introduce and reinforce ideas by having nonfiction titles at the ready. Follow Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs with Weather by Seymour Simon. Robots by Melissa Stewart is great after reading Rabbit & Robot: The Sleepover. And don’t hesitate to dive into Exploring the Deep, Dark Sea by Gail Gibbons after reading Swimmy by Leo Lionni.




You can even take things a step further. Follow up your reading with activities or outings that offer opportunities for kids to take what they’ve learned and own it. For example, hand out big metal spoons after you’ve shared both Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs and Weather. Ask kids what will happen if they breathe on the back of the spoon. Have them do it and see if they create their own tiny cloud of water vapor! Talk about what you read about what happens when warm, moist air and cool air come together. They just made a cloud! 







Here are some terrific online resources to help you put fiction, nonfiction and great activities together. 

Award-winning author Melissa Stewart has not only written more than 150 science books for children but  also frequently speaks and writes about ways to teach science through literature. This article highlights her idea of Perfect Pairs and offers example pairs of fiction and nonfiction along with connections, discussion questions and activities.

Start with a Book, a project of Reading Rockets, offers 24 kid-friendly themes featuring specific ideas for using fiction and nonfiction books and related downloadable activities to get kids thinking, talking, creating and exploring. Reading Rockets also has Reading Adventure Packs (in English and Spanish), which provide recommended fiction and nonfiction titles along with printable activities and bookmarks.

Here’s the thing: as adult readers, we are constantly pairing fiction and nonfiction without even thinking about it. When you’re reading a great historical fiction title, don’t you look up the actual history? If you’re enjoying a novel set in present-day Paraguay, don’t you consult a travel website? And if you really love an author’s books, don’t you look for articles or a biography to read about his life? Just as you follow your curiosity, kids want to do the same. They just need you to help them make the match.


Guest blog post by Belle of the Book, Rachael Walker.

To receive credit for this online training, please fill out the form here.








Monday, October 3, 2016

No more reluctant readers!


Avid reader? Struggling reader? Reluctant reader? Bad reader? 

Labels do matter, but so do positive reading experiences and a supportive community. The Reading Connection's programs provide opportunities and a community for at-risk kids to see their reading selves in a positive way.

Publishers Weekly* recently interviewed two seventh-grade teachers about how their goal of creating lifelong readers informs the way they talk to the kids, arrange their classrooms and set their priorities. Their insights, while gained working in school classrooms, offer inspiring examples that can be applied to our Read-Alouds. 


Teacher Pernille Ripp describes how kids develop their reading identities as follows:
"No child comes to kindergarten and tells us that they are a struggling reader... Instead, that identity is created within our classrooms, within our groupings, and within our hallway conversations, where students quickly figure out which labels should identify them....
 [T]here are so many readers who are not confident, or who don’t see reading as something they would ever do for pleasure. Does it matter what label we give them? Or do we simply need to help create a positive experience for them? Can we somehow re-frame the past experiences they have had with books and get them to reinvest, if even for a moment?" (emphasis added) 


The Reading Connection's programs are all about helping kids experience the joy, excitement and empowerment that reading can provide. Our Read-Alouds provide fun, no-stress experiences with books. We purposely conduct Read-Alouds that are exciting and interactive and include hands-on experiences and lots of conversation to show kids that reading doesn't always have to be solitary or school-related.

Helping kids become regular and passionate readers involves not just supporting their identity as readers but also creating a community where they can share their experiences and be supported by fellow readers. 

Again, Ms. Ripp's insights apply to the community building aspect of our programs.
"...[O]ne voracious reader will never be enough in order to get books in the hands of children. Finding allies in your school or community is important, bringing them in to book-talk books or simply having reading discussions with them is huge for reaching more students. Creating a visible reading culture is important as well.
It seems to me that often our self-identified nonreaders are also the ones that feel school is not a place for them. So we have to find a way of making them feel like they matter, like this place is for them, and that together we can create an experience that they want to be a part of."
TRC volunteers play a crucial role in creating that reading culture and helping kids develop a positive reading self-image. By talking with kids about books and kids' interests, feelings and experiences, our volunteers build relationships with the kids around books. These relationships of mutual respect and curiosity foster kids' identities as readers and valued community members.




Like Ms. Ripp, TRC wants all kids to be (and identify as) regular and passionate readers. Beyond the mechanics of getting through a Read-Aloud, we always try to build motivation and enthusiasm -- two essentials that can mean the difference between building strong reading skills or giving up. 

Once again, in Ms. Ripp's words,
"In the end, however a reader identifies, it really comes down to us to create an experience that will help them find amazing books, support them as they grow, and create a community of readers."
At The Reading Connection, our goal is that every child will be a regular and passionate reader. All of our programs are designed help kids develop identities as curious, joyful, regular, passionate readers and build reading communities that they can belong to.

*Creating Lifelong Readers: Two English Teachers Discuss What Works With Their Students, moderated by Shannon Maughan, August 19, 2016



To receive credit for this online training, please fill out the form here.